The 3 main advantages of the 3 piece suit

As a frequent reader to our blog, you may have noticed already, that we often mention 3-piece suits. That is not accidental, but there of course lays a reason behind, just like with anything in life. It is our firm belief that a gent should at least own one classic and timeless suit, and nothing beats a three-piece suit when it comes to wearing a truly traditional look.

This article will focus on the top 3 advantages of wearing a bespoke 3 piece suit.

The feel of a 3-piece suit

If you have worn a three-piece suit before, you will most likely approve that the feel of wearing one, especially when it is a custom-tailored one, really is beyond match.

Even if you haven’t you will be able to acknowledge how logical this fact is, in just a minute. What separates the 3-piece suit from a 2-piece variant is, not surprisingly – the third peace! Well, that probably didn’t knoch you off the chair, but with a waistcoat added to the look you’ll instantly transform into a successful-looking gentleman. It is absolute crucial to have your waistcoat following the contour of your body perfectly, so you may want to consider getting this custom-tailored instead of the off-the rack alternatives you’ll find in retail stores around the globe. The feel you have from this is just being more held in place or more held together. Gents, think of when you hit that baseball diamond or the football field with, or without your jock. That’s the difference in feel. A custom-tailored waistcoat also adds a slimming look, even though it is considered an extra layer. It shows a strong balance of fabric, all the way from your shoulders and down to your shoes. Finally, it is important to think about how it would actually make YOU feel, personally.
When you unbutton your jacket (single breasted) as you take a seat, you’re still buttoned up (your vest/waistcoat) which still gives you that distinguished look, you don’t need to worry about how tightly tucked your shirt is – your waistcoat handles it for you.
When you stand, and your hands are on your hips, or in your pockets and your jacket flaps are back again, you still appear suited up and in charge. These are undoubtedly some of the subtle but impacting style marks you make wearing your three piece suits. You remain put together at all times!

The fit of a 3-piece suit

When talking about the fit, which we’ll cover in this second point, it should be mentioned that the major focus needs to be the waistcoat/vest. It should slide down the sides of your body sleek with no protrusions, lumps, or anything else. You need to make sure it’s still breathable and comfortable and tailored properly, it shouldn’t act like a corset – it should be a well-tailored vest.
One very important aspect to the fit that also plays into your overall style with this piece, is the collar type you choose for your vest. We currently offer the notch, peak, and shawl lapel options for our custom-tailored vests with all our three piece suits. Collars and lapels help to define a man’s face, whether they’re on a dress shirt, a suit jacket or a vest, and if you wear this vest alone with no jacket lapels, then you should have some on your vest to help define your face. Since the fit of most three piece suits are a bit more snug especially around the belt line, belts with this suit are not entirely needed and can make you look a bit puffy around your waistline. The choice is yours, of course. Remember these hints regarding the fit of your three piece suits, and you will have your suit the suit among suits.

The fashion of a 3-piece suit

When it comes to what statement this suit makes, or even better yet what you can do with it, where you can wear it or even how you can wear it, the options are plentiful. Three piece suits give every man the the following options: You can wear the vest alone with a button down and jeans, you can wear the vest with another two piece suit as long as the colors and fabrics are complementing each other, you can wear the suit as a two piece and leave the vest at home, you can also wear it with a pair of jeans and a blazer, you can wear it to the office, events, and formal events. You can also wear this suit with or without a tie, the only thing I would mention is to always keep it buttoned otherwise the slimming and proper gentleman persona it provides will slip away.


Top 5 suit patterns – All you need to know about suit patterns

Since we’ve covered the fact that custom-tailored suits make for a far better choice compared to off-the rack alternatives, we also need to talk about the difference in the suit patterns there is to have. You see many suits, many of which have different patterns. Variety is good, variety is crucial. Suits are worn often (or should be), whether that is for dinner parties, events, wedding, business meetings and much more. Having a good understanding of what suit fabrics work best for what events and for what type of weather is key.
That is what this article wants to achieve.
Generally, patterned suits are ideally suited for more casual, informal events compared to solid colored suits. But, just like wine, everyone has a different palate, more so when it comes to style.

Here are the top 5 suit patterns there is to be had and chosen when it comes to bespoke clothing.

Glen Check Plaids

Possibly the most common of all plaid suit patterns is the glen check plaid. This was originally known as the Glen Urquhart Plaid which stemmed from the valley in Scotland named “Glenurquhart” in Inverness-shire. Around 1926 is when the newer name of Glen Check Plaid surfaced, which was made popular by the Duke of Windsor, when he was the Prince of Wales. It is probably the most produced of all plaid suit patterns today and due to its timeless history and it will probably remain so for quite some time.

The Tartan Plaid

The Tartan plaid is more of a louder style of plaid suit pattern that usually encompasses multiple colors. Those colors can be more earth-toned at times, and then also less subdued as well. In America most tartan is called and known as just “plaid”, but in Scotland a “tartan” cloth is usually an accessory for most kilts, which is hung over the shoulder or on the bed as a blanket. This suit pattern also originates from Scotland where many plaid patterns were born.

The Graph Check

Unlike that of any custom dress shirt, the graph check men’s suit pattern is quite difficult to actually see. It is quite small and very intricate. Most suits with this pattern can sometimes be mistaken for solid color suits, since their stitching is so close, that it’s hard to make out the check pattern in the fabric. If you’re looking for suit patterns that are close to solid colors, but with just a dash of something else, this would be our recommendation.

The Chalk Stripe

A little bit thicker than its extremely well known counter-part the pinstripe, the Chalk Stripe suit pattern boasts a strong demand for attention. It is usually the size most men are looking for in the pinstripe, but don’t realize the pinstripe is a little less wide, and a little less “in your face”, if you will.

However, while the pinstripe can be worn to certain formal events, the chalk stripe is a bit too loud for such gatherings. The chalk stripe can come in multiple suit fabrics like wool or a wool/silk blends depending on the climate of where you live, you should give yourself choices.

The Madras Plaid

The madras plaid is one of the most well known and most commonly seen suit patterns that few know the name of. It once originated from East India, and this pattern is usually quite soft in appearance. With dress shirts it is usually made up of many different colors.
This style of plaid has been known to be a bit more on a the preppy side do to its relaxed and casual appearance.
If you choose the right fabric this pattern can be used in many different seasons.

That’s it this week

Don’t forget that If you liked what you read, or have any questions, please feel free to let us know! If you’d like to design your own custom-tailored suit from hundreds of fabric options get in touch with us, so we can start the process of designing your next custom-tailored garment already today!

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Five fabrics for your bespoke suit

Materials 101: Five fabrics for your bespoke suit

At Exclusive Tailors you have a vast choice in materials, which can be a bit overwhelming at first. Our bespoke suits can be crafted from a selection of over 300 materials, with new collections being added (and replaced) constantly along the way, to always keep a range of stylish, fresh and up to date materials according to the different seasons and weather conditions around the globe. We therefore don’t blame any of our customers, if they’re feeling a bit drowsy, when they have a first glance on our material selection in-store. What we can guarantee you though is that you’ll end up with an educated choice, when you’re choosing a fabric for your next tailored garment from Exclusive Tailors, as we do take pride in providing all information necessary prior and after the purchase of our clients. We like to see ourself as a one-stop shop for style and wardrobe needs. That is also for those that are new to tailored clothing, those who are looking for a new style or a fit that works well with their body shape, activity level, usage and personal style.

To make things a little easier for you, who is not able to make it to our shop in Patong, Phuket, we’ve compiled this little guide about the most popular suit fabrics and their individual uses. Take a look and see which fabric would work best for you..

Wool

Wool has long been the most popular material with which to produce a tailored suit, and still remains so today. There are two distinct weaving techniques used in the production of wool suits, with worsted being the most common of the pair. Worsted suits employ combed wool fibres to produce a smooth finish, while woollens retain the loose fibres and thus boast a fluffier texture. Wool is comparatively cool, resistant to creasing and durable, making it ideal for use in tailored suits.

Cotton

Cotton is also a very common fabric when it comes to the production of tailored suits in the United States or Asia, but for some reason, never has caught on in Europe. Cotton ‘seersucker’ suits are lightweight and useful for summer wear – hence their popularity in the sweltering Southern States.
Seersucker suits are characterised by fine pinstripes and a distinctive bobbled texture, while the properties of cotton mean that even bespoke suits can be machine-washed.

Linen

Linen suits have had their more popular dates, when every gentleman would have had at least one linen summer suit stored away in his wardrobe. Linen has the advantage to be extremely lightweight and breathable, making it ideal for the summer months, but the material isn’t particularly practical for year-round use, which disqualifies it from being an all-year round suit, unless you live in hotter temperatures, like parts of Asia, Southern US and perhaps Spain, Portugal and of course Latin America.
Linen has a tendency to crease easily, and the lightweight fabric also means that rips and tears can be difficult to avoid.

Tweed

Tweed is more of an informal fabric for use in the manufacturing of bespoke suits, and is thus infrequently used in a business context. Tweed is a relatively thick and sturdy material – warmer than a standard wool suit – and comes in a variety of colours and patterns. Tweed is generally associated with gentle country pursuits and, while full tweed suits are rarely worn today, a bespoke tweed suit jacket can be an excellent addition to your informal wardrobe.

Silk

While silk is often used as a lining in tailored suit jackets, some suits can also be made from silk alone. Silk has a number of properties that makes it an excellent choice for a bespoke suit, with a natural lustre and supple movement making for an elegant garment.
Silk is a delicate material, however, and can be easily torn when wet, while the properties of the fabric means that silk suits can be quite clingy.

Each material comes with a range of advantages and disadvantages in the manufacture of bespoke suits, and depending on the intended purpose of your garment then different materials may be more suitable than other for your needs.

Contact us for a free style consultation, or take a look at our other blog topics for more information on the differences between tailored suits. Here you’ll find articles for both Ladies and Gents.